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(Tee Bryan Peneguy) #1007

Absolute truth


(Tee Bryan Peneguy) #1008

The Bible says that when the Antichrist comes, he may even fool the Christians! If only they had SOME clue to recognize him…

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(Tee Bryan Peneguy) #1009

“THE PRESIDENT HAS BEEN EXONERATED!” …The GOP is trying to GASLIGHT an entire nation in BROAD DAYLIGHT

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#1010

Sometimes I feel like the Trump Era is less All the Presidents Men and more like a caper story sigh… I do love a good caper. :male_detective:t2:‍♀


(David Bythewood) #1011


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(David Bythewood) #1021


(David Bythewood) #1022


#1023

Americans Fear That Former Trump Staffers Will Be Released Into Their Cities

WASHINGTON (The Borowitz Report)—Americans are in a state of abject panic amid reports that Donald J. Trump is threatening to dump thousands of fired Cabinet members and aides on cities that do not support him.

Harland Dorrinson, who lives in San Francisco, said that “every American should be alarmed” at the spectre of former Trump staffers like Kirstjen Nielsen, Scott Pruitt, and Anthony Scaramucci descending on their towns.

“A lot of these people were unsavory to begin with, and their time at the White House only hardened them,” he said.

Carol Foyler, who resides in Boston, said that, with Trump staffers being fired at a rate of four hundred a day, she lives in terror at the prospect of these castoffs melting into the general population.

“I was on line at Starbucks the other day and I thought I saw Steve Bannon,” she said. “It turned out it was just some other creepy-looking guy, but my heart was racing. The fear is real.”

Tracy Klugian, who lives in Minneapolis, has started a petition to create a city ordinance preventing former Trump aides from settling in his town. “This city is full,” he said.

As they brace themselves for an onslaught of fired Trump underlings, some Americans are grasping for a silver lining. “As of now, Stephen Miller and Sarah Huckabee Sanders are still employed at the White House, where their movements can be closely monitored,” Foyler said. “But, it if that changes, God help us all.”


#1024

If Barr were to redact Dicken’s “A Tale of Two Cities”


(M A Croft) #1025

The Mueller report may possibly be the most-read document in the country at this point, but it’s not doing so hot on Goodreads.

From the one review: “The previous owner used a black highlighter on all the interesting bits and the main character has no redeeming qualities.”


#1026

WaPo’s book critic had a little fun today too.

The Mueller report is that rare Washington tell-all that surpasses its pre-publication hype.

Sure, it is a little longer than necessary. Too many footnotes and distracting redactions. The writing is often flat, and the first half of the book drags, covering plenty of terrain that has been described elsewhere. The story shifts abruptly between riveting insider tales and dense legalisms. Its protagonist doesn’t really come alive until halfway through, once Volume I (on Russian interference) gives way to Volume II (on obstruction of justice). The title — far too prosaic, really — feels like a missed opportunity. And it hardly helps that the book’s earliest reviewer, Attorney General William Barr, seems to have willfully misunderstood the point of it; he probably should not have been assigned to review it at all.

Yet as an authoritative account, the Mueller report is the best book by far on the workings of the Trump presidency. It was delivered to the attorney general but is also written for history. The book reveals the president in all his impulsiveness, insecurity and growing disregard for rules and norms; White House aides alternating between deference to the man and defiance of his “crazy s—” requests; and a campaign team too inept to realize, or too reckless to care, when they might have been bending the law. And special counsel Robert Mueller has it all under oath, on the record, along with interviews and contemporaneous notes backing it up. No need for a “Note on Use of Anonymous Sources” disclaimer. Mueller doesn’t just have receipts — he seems to know what almost everyone wanted to buy.

[…]

In its portrait of the Trump campaign and White House, the Mueller report also echoes recent, high-profile works. The mix of incompetence, disorganization and self-interest evident here evokes Michael Wolff’s “Fire and Fury,” which depicts a Trump inner circle both unprepared and uninterested in actually governing. In the Mueller report, top members of the Trump team take meetings with foreign representatives without so much as Googling their names. A random hedge fund manager friendly with Jared Kushner ends up co-writing a memo on U.S.-Russian relations that Kushner delivers to incoming Secretary of State Rex Tillerson. Donald Trump Jr. probably doesn’t know enough about campaign finance laws to grasp the legal peril of the infamous Trump Tower meeting in June 2016. And even candidate Donald Trump admits the purpose of his presidential bid when he suggests to personal lawyer Michael Cohen “that his campaign would be a significant ‘infomercial’ for Trump-branded properties.”