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More Questionable Behavior from Trump, T Admin, DOJ, and R's vs Dems, Press, Justice


#424

Michael Cohen is writing a tell-all, and was returned to jail (during the Covid-19) outbreak because he is writing such a book. Cohen is bringing a lawsuit with help from ACLU to counter the government.

And the Government is subjecting Cohen to a restraining order. (see document cloud below)

Michael D. Cohen says it was no secret that he was writing a jailhouse tell-all book about his former boss, President Trump. He spent hours at a stretch working on his manuscript in a prison library before he was released on furlough in May because of the coronavirus.

Then, earlier this month, federal officials abruptly sent Mr. Cohen back to prison because he balked at signing an agreement that would have let him stay at home with a key restriction: He would not have been allowed to publish his book before the November elections.

Now Mr. Cohen has responded with a lawsuit claiming that the government has violated his First Amendment rights by returning him to custody and interrupting his writing.

The lawsuit, filed in federal court in Manhattan on Monday night, asked a judge to once again release Mr. Cohen and let him to serve the remainder of his three-year sentence back in home confinement.

The complaint, filed on Mr. Cohen’s behalf by private lawyers and the American Civil Liberties Union, accuses Attorney General William P. Barr and federal prison officials of using his return to prison as a way to stop the publication of the book, which, court papers say, paints the president as a racist.

“The government cannot imprison Michael Cohen for writing a book about President Trump,” said Ben Wizner, director of the A.C.L.U.’s Speech, Privacy and Technology Project.

https://twitter.com/rgoodlaw/status/1286054486319009792?s=20

https://twitter.com/KlasfeldReports/status/1286031074821312523?s=20


#425

AG Barr wants to sound like their Operation Legend is doing a super job with the arrests, but got caught in a lie concerning the number of arrests in Kansas City. Barr says the Feds had 200 arrests in a 2 week period, and then DOJ had to backtrack to say that number reflected both State and Federal arrests since Dec. 2019.

https://www.kansascity.com/news/local/crime/article244421027.html

A senior Department of Justice official on Wednesday corrected comments by Attorney General William Barr, who minutes earlier had said 200 arrests had been made within two weeks in Kansas City as part of Operation Legend, a federal anti-crime effort.

Barr’s comments had come during a news conference Wednesday about the operation, which is said to be sending hundreds of federal agents into the metro area to stop a surge of violent crime in the city.

“Just to give you an idea of what’s possible, the FBI went in very strong into Kansas City and within two weeks we’ve had 200 arrests,” Barr had said.

The number baffled many in Kansas City, including local officials who said they could not vouch for it.

Speaking with McClatchy after the Wednesday event, the senior Justice Department official clarified that the 200 figure included arrests dating back to December 2019.

It also included, the official said, both state and FBI arrests in joint operations.

https://twitter.com/matthewamiller/status/1286081312756031488?s=20


#426

AG Barr under more attack for his underhanded ways of handling the cases and making false statements in favor of the President and not for the United States. The DC Bar has written a letter complaining about his work for DOJ and ultimately this could lead to disbarment.

Four former presidents of the D.C. Bar Association have signed a letter calling on the group to investigate whether Attorney General William Barr has violated its rules. The District of Columbia Bar authorizes lawyers to practice in the city and has the power to punish them for breaking its rules and to revoke their law licenses.

The complaint argues that Barr has broken Washington’s ethics rules by being dishonest and violating his oath to uphold the Constitution, along with other charges. And it highlights four episodes in Barr’s time as attorney general to make the case: his characterization of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russia’s 2016 election interference, his criticism of an inspector general report on the Russia probe, his criticism of FBI officials in a TV interview, and his role in the disbursement of peaceful protesters from Lafayette Square, outside the White House. A spokesperson for the Justice Department declined to comment.

Mr. Barr’s client is the United States, and not the president,” the letter says. “Yet, Mr. Barr has consistently made decisions and taken action to serve the personal and political self-interests of President Donald Trump, rather than the interest of the United States.”

Barr’s early description of the Mueller report and his handling of protesters in Lafayette Square have long drawn pointed criticism. But his comments on the inspector general report on the FBI’s Russia probe hasn’t drawn as much attention. In an NBC News interview after the report’s release, Barr called the FBI’s basis for opening the Russia probe “very flimsy.” The letter argues that the criticism was dishonest.

“Indeed, the notion that the legitimacy of an FBI investigation’s initiation should be judged by its end, if applied broadly, could easily chill the initiation of wholly legitimate inquiries for fear of being second-guessed,” the letter adds.

The letter also argues that Barr broke the D.C. Bar’s rules when he criticized former FBI officials’ decisions regarding the Russia probe and suggested they could be prosecuted. The letter focused on a comment Barr made in a CBS News interview: “Just because something may even stink to high heaven and … appear [to] everyone to be bad, we still have to apply the right standard and be convinced that there’s a violation of a criminal statute.”

The letter argued the statement could unfairly influence potential criminal proceedings against those officials and that Barr should have followed the standard DOJ practice of declining to comment on ongoing investigations. John Durham, the U.S. attorney for Connecticut, is investigating the Russia probe’s origins. Some Trump allies, including White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, have intimated that he will bring criminal charges against officials who worked on the probe.

Justice Department spokesperson Kerri Kupec recently told Fox News that Durham is expected to issue a report by summer’s end. “There are no guarantees in life, but we certainly hope to see one by the end of the summer. I think it’s important,” she said.

The complaint’s signatories include a host of legal ethics experts and former government lawyers. Andrea Ferster, Philip Allen Lacovara, Marna S. Tucker, and Melvin White — all former presidents of the D.C. Bar — also signed on.

Bar associations can take years to review disciplinary complaints, and their processes are kept confidential. The letter comes as Barr faces sharp criticism from leaders in the legal profession. Late last month, the president of the New York City Bar Association and chair of its task force on the rule of law sent a letter to top members of Congress calling him “unfit” for his job and raising some of the same concerns raised in this letter.

@Pet_Proletariat @MissJava Can you move to Questionable please? Thanks!


Mentionable News
#427

Satirical “Protest Jobs” Website Was Source of Official Warnings About Leftist Violence

A Situational Information Report by the FBI’s San Antonio Division, dated June 3, states: “unidentified individuals discussed various websites for payment to agitate and commit violent acts.” Payments to “violent agitators” were made “anonymously via Bitcoin” and “were rumored to be managed by members of Antifa.” The report claims “targets and locations were also discussed on the websites.”

The two sites cited in the report are crowdsondemand.com and protestjobs.com.

Crowds on Demand is a legitimate public-relations business, based in Beverly Hills, that provides paid participants primarily for corporate and media events.

Protest Jobs, however, is entirely satirical. The site’s creator, who spoke to Mainer on condition of anonymity due to online threats, designed it in 2017 as a joke to mock right-wing conspiracies about paid leftist protesters. He even included a jab at the newly elected president, offering a “Free National Parks [Service] tweet comparing the size of your protest to the inauguration” as a perk included in the priciest protest package.

Calling this intelligence would be an oxymoron.


(David Bythewood) #428

More proof positive that Trump supporters don’t understand subtle humor. Or even blatant.

Also, it seems this is a general issue:


(David Bythewood) #429

Judge orders release of former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen by Friday, says book publication ban was retaliation


(David Bythewood) #430

Philadelphia’s Top Prosecutor Is Prepared to Arrest Federal Agents

After Trump said he would send agents to more cities, Philly’s district attorney lays out how he might criminally charge federal officers.

https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2020-07-22/philly-d-a-threatens-to-arrest-federal-agents


#431

Oh fuck no


(David Bythewood) #432


An image from the first aid tent in Portland that was sprayed with pepper spray.


#433

“Federal agents sent to Seattle area for standby, as Mayor Durkan seeks assurances they won’t crack down on protesters](https://www.seattletimes.com/seattle-news/federal-agents-will-be-on-standby-in-seattle-but-mayor-durkan-says-theyre-not-being-sent-to-crack-down-on-protesters

Yeah, I don’t get this. Do we even have any federal buildings here? And if so, have any been damaged? Or is this all just because Mayor Durkan is a Democrat? Or our proximity to Portland? I REALLY hope this doesn’t get ugly!


#434

We have some federal buildings but no monuments.


(David Bythewood) #435

An excellent thread analyzing Operation Legend, Bill Barr’s attempt to normalize the fascist undermining of American rights and cities with Trump’s gestapo:

https://twitter.com/JesseDamiani/status/1286042286460002305?s=20

A Guide to Emergency Powers and Their Use

The 136 statutory powers that may become available to the president upon declaration of a national emergency.


(David Bythewood) #436

Uncertain, forming story: This is former General Russel L. Honoré IDing the use of private mercenaries in Portland.


https://twitter.com/ltgrusselhonore/status/1286695929534386176

EDIT: The general took that post down and has this up now:
image

‘What Kind of Bullsh*t Is This?!’: Retired General Who Led Katrina Response GOES OFF on Trump’s Militarized Portland Crackdown

Trump Bragged About Gassing Portland’s Mayor: ‘They Knocked the Hell Out of Him’

He also threatened to send tens of thousands of federal troops to cities, whether mayors wanted them there or not.

Trump Gloats After Portland Mayor Gets Jeered, Tear-Gassed: ‘That Was The End Of Him’


This is why we say Trump doesn’t have any master plan; bragging about this openly confirms that he is attacking political rivals and can be used against him in court.


#437

Well, maybe there’s still SOME parts of our government that aren’t hopelessly tainted.


#438

The IG reports only have weight if there’s proper Congressional oversight. The courts will rule on this one faster than the IG can conduct his investigation. Still worth pursuing to examine the rules and laws governing this issue.

After Trump, there really needs to be special committees to examine all the damage this administration has done to our political norms and institutions. Some norms need to become law.

And I feel like all Presidential Candidates should have to pass a simple background check with the details made public. We the people deserve to know who we are hiring.


#439

Well, you’ve got a point there. Like, he can be impeached (and HAS been), but it still takes Congress to act on it to remove him from office.

And also agreed that what I guess has been up to now accepted as ‘Standard Social Norms’ should probably be revisited and better defined in our (hopefully soon to be realized) After Trump Experience.

LIke for one, I can’t believe how many people are just fine with Trump promising to release his taxes one elected, and then refusing to. I mean, if THAT isn’t evidence that he’s hiding something, I don’t know what is.


#440

Bingo! It’s terrible because of polarization of both Houses. Oversight is being left to the courts because Republicans in Congress would rather confirm judges and give speeches during hearings. The House Democrats impeached him because of only one of the many impeachable offenses he has committed while in office.

Unfortunately for Impeachment and removal you would need a two-thirds majority in the Senate. That’s never going to happen even if we win back the majority in the upper house. We’d need a supermajority.

We have to vote him out.

The checks and balances are too slow to keep up with the power of the presidency. The powers are far too vast.

Read :point_down:

But will they? Unknown to most Americans, a parallel legal regime allows the president to sidestep many of the constraints that normally apply. The moment the president declares a “national emergency”—a decision that is entirely within his discretion—more than 100 special provisions become available to him. While many of these tee up reasonable responses to genuine emergencies, some appear dangerously suited to a leader bent on amassing or retaining power. For instance, the president can, with the flick of his pen, activate laws allowing him to shut down many kinds of electronic communications inside the United States or freeze Americans’ bank accounts. Other powers are available even without a declaration of emergency, including laws that allow the president to deploy troops inside the country to subdue domestic unrest.

`


#441

This is TOO much power for one person; ANY person, even much more…I’m going to use the word “stable” people…than our current president. I mean, look at Dubya. They had an investigation, determined there were no more Weapons of Mass Distruction in Iraq, so what do we do? We go to war with Iraq because of their WMDs that they no longer had.

My next question is, assuming things DO play out the way it’s looking; ie, Trump loses the election AND moves out of the White House one way or another, THEN what? How long, if ever, will this country again have some semblance of unity? I’m REALLY going to have to resign from Social Media, some of the interactions I’ve had with some people on twitter are really pretty frightening. While I’d vote for Kermit the Frog before I’d vote for Trump, Biden doesn’t seem like he’s really got it in him to be the most dynamic leader; and while perhaps twitter’s a relatively small cross-section, there ARE some pretty extremist views out there. I guess it might be easier if we can take both the House AND the Senate. In any case, the entire first four years will probably just be damage control.


#442

He’s no dynamo but he does have a board coalition of voters. He’s earned the respect of lots different people through his lifetime of public service. But my favorite thing about Biden though is his ability to show empathy through a difficult time. The contrast is stark. Biden is rising in the polls because of that contrast. Let Trump spin his web of lies and crazy twitter rants. At the end of the day everyone just wants stability and safety.

And yes Twitter is not real life.

This was from a while back but there was talk of only a single term just to right the ship.


#443

"He’s no dynamo but he does have a board coalition of voters. He’s earned the respect of lots different people through his lifetime of public service. But my favorite thing about Biden though is his ability to show empathy through a difficult time. The contrast is stark. Biden is rising in the polls because of that contrast. Let Trump spin his web of lies and crazy twitter rants. At the end of the day everyone just wants stability and safety.

And yes Twitter is not real life.

This was from a while back but there was talk of only a single term just to right the ship."

I was a Bernie delegate in 2016 and liked his energy, but Biden had the numbers this go 'round and I didn’t want to risk another upset Trump win. To Biden’s credit, I think his heart’s in the right place, and I also think he was a stutterer in his younger years which he’s overcome nicely, but suspect that might be a contributor to his not infrequent verbal gaffs. I hope he can stay cool while debating Trump, as Trump will seize on any opportunity to try tripping him up and embarrassing him.

And personally, I don’t think that it’s Biden rising in the polls, but Trump sinking in the polls because of his mishanding our response to the Coronavirus/Covid-19 (well really, not handling it at ALL). We’re not through this yet, and while I DO find it COMPLETELY beyond belief, Trump STILL has a lot of loyal followers, and I think there also might be some dirty tricks coming.

I hadn’t heard about the one-term thing, but I guess that’s okay, as long as we can get Trump OUTTA there.