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US in crisis - Black Lives Matter Fallout - National and local responses


(David Bythewood) #61

Tucker Carlson Blames Jared Kushner for Trump’s Protest Catastrophe

The Fox News host said that Kushner had “subverted” Trump every step of the way during his presidency.

But then there is this:

How Trump’s Idea for a Photo Op Led to Havoc in a Park

When the history of the Trump presidency is written, the clash with protesters that preceded ## Trump’s walk across Lafayette Square may be remembered as one of its defining, and lowest, moments.


#62

Statement from the peace loving, social justice progressives Ben & Jerry on George Lloyd’s murder.

Silence Is NOT An Option | Ben & Jerry’s

Silence Is NOT An Option

All of us at Ben & Jerry’s are outraged about the murder of another Black person by Minneapolis police officers last week and the continued violent response by police against protestors. We have to speak out. We have to stand together with the victims of murder, marginalization, and repression because of their skin color, and with those who seek justice through protests across our country. We have to say his name: George Floyd.

George Floyd was a son, a brother, a father, and a friend. The police officer who put his knee on George Floyd’s neck and the police officers who stood by and watched didn’t just murder George Floyd, they stole him. They stole him from his family and his friends, his church and his community, and from his own future.

The murder of George Floyd was the result of inhumane police brutality that is perpetuated by a culture of white supremacy. What happened to George Floyd was not the result of a bad apple; it was the predictable consequence of a racist and prejudiced system and culture that has treated Black bodies as the enemy from the beginning. What happened to George Floyd in Minneapolis is the fruit borne of toxic seeds planted on the shores of our country in Jamestown in 1619, when the first enslaved men and women arrived on this continent. Floyd is the latest in a long list of names that stretches back to that time and that shore. Some of those names we know — Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Oscar Grant, Eric Garner, Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown, Emmett Till, Martin Luther King, Jr. — most we don’t.

The officers who murdered George Floyd, who stole him from those who loved him, must be brought to justice. At the same time, we must embark on the more complicated work of delivering justice for all the victims of state sponsored violence and racism.

Four years ago, we publicly stated our support for the Black Lives Matter movement. Today, we want to be even more clear about the urgent need to take concrete steps to dismantle white supremacy in all its forms. To do that, we are calling for four things:

First , we call upon President Trump, elected officials, and political parties to commit our nation to a formal process of healing and reconciliation. Instead of calling for the use of aggressive tactics on protestors, the President must take the first step by disavowing white supremacists and nationalist groups that overtly support him, and by not using his Twitter feed to promote and normalize their ideas and agendas. The world is watching America’s response.

Second , we call upon the Congress to pass H.R. 40, legislation that would create a commission to study the effects of slavery and discrimination from 1619 to the present and recommend appropriate remedies. We cannot move forward together as a nation until we begin to grapple with the sins of our past. Slavery, Jim Crow, and segregation were systems of legalized and monetized white supremacy for which generations of Black and Brown people paid an immeasurable price. That cost must be acknowledged and the privilege that accrued to some at the expense of others must be reckoned with and redressed.

Third , we support Floyd’s family’s call to create a national task force that would draft bipartisan legislation aimed at ending racial violence and increasing police accountability. We can’t continue to fund a criminal justice system that perpetuates mass incarceration while at the same time threatens the lives of a whole segment of the population.

And finally , we call on the Department of Justice to reinvigorate its Civil Rights Division as a staunch defender of the rights of Black and Brown people. The DOJ must also reinstate policies rolled back under the Trump Administration, such as consent decrees to curb police abuses.

Unless and until white America is willing to collectively acknowledge its privilege, take responsibility for its past and the impact it has on the present, and commit to creating a future steeped in justice, the list of names that George Floyd has been added to will never end. We have to use this moment to accelerate our nation’s long journey towards justice and a more perfect union.


#63


#64


#65

Help out, here is a list of things you can do to stay in the fight


(David Bythewood) #66

The DEA Has Been Given Permission To Investigate People Protesting George Floyd’s Death

The Justice Department gave the agency the temporary power “to enforce any federal crime committed as a result of the protests over the death of George Floyd.”

Trump offers ‘domination’ of D.C. protests as model for states


#67

More CYA on Sec of Defense Esper’s part @GracieC

https://twitter.com/NBCNews/status/1268185637921964032?s=20

Adding this


(David Bythewood) #68

‘Carnage,’ ‘radicals,’ ‘overthrow the government’: How Fox and other conservative media cover the protests

Thread from the protests of denial of medical treatment:
https://twitter.com/MartiGCummings/status/1268206923729469440?s=20

Attorney General Keith Ellison to elevate charges against officer who knelt on George Floyd’s neck; also charging other 3 involved


(David Bythewood) #69

I may just be a small town bunker inspector, but I call BS on Trump’s claim he was rushed to the White House bunker for “an inspection”.

Everyone knows a proper bunker inspection should never be rushed & should be conducted BEFORE you start soiling your pants.

Twitter explodes with laughter when Trump claims he was rushed to bunker for ‘inspection’


#70

Live :eyes:

Just ending his speech. Just caught some.


(David Bythewood) #71

https://twitter.com/TrinityResists/status/1268278987626647552?s=20


#72

Washington DC is getting more military tonight, on top of the forces that they already have. You wonder if some of what DOD Esper and ex DOD Mattis talked about today about there is too much force going into DC, it divides and the city and all cities are better without huge military presence. Curfew is at 11p tonight

20%20DC%20Military%201

20%20More%20troops

Changing of the guards…DC

Adding this 6.3.20 9.28pm pst

20%20Schmidt%20secret%20police


update june 4, 2020

These police are the from the DC Dept of Prisons and Utah national guards

20%20Dept%20of%20Prisons

20%20Haake%20Utah%20Ntl%20Grd

link to Josh Marshall
https://twitter.com/GarrettHaake/status/1268361997097320454?s=20

Adding this explanation from Heather Cox Richardson’s newsletter 6.3.20

June 3, 2020

Heather Cox Richardson Jun 4 \ 15x20 \ 11x20

Social media roiled all day as users tried to figure out who were the soldiers in Washington, D.C. wearing no identification and saying they reported to the Department of Justice. Tonight the answer came: they were riot teams from the Federal Bureau of Prisons, a law enforcement agency under the Department of Justice that oversees incarcerated people.

This is problematic for a number of reasons. First, according to Holocaust scholar Waitman Wade Beorn, who studies ethical decision making in the military, it’s a problem because soldiers are trained to defend civilians while prison guards are used to seeing civilians as their enemies, and are accustomed to using force, rather than de-escalation, to subdue them. The U.S. military, Beorn points out, does not like to be employed against Americans, and has a long tradition of that reluctance.

Their lack of name tags and insignia was also problematic. It hampers accountability-- how can you complain about the actions of an officer if you cannot identify him?-- and it blurs the lines between actual officers of the law and the men on the streets toting guns and demanding protesters answer to them. The use of unidentifiable police is common among authoritarian leaders.


(David Bythewood) #73

This is so damn infuriating. George Floyd tested positive for COVID-19 in April, survived & recovered from it only to be murdered by some callous, racist cop.

This is why we say the deck is stacked against minorities in this country.


#74

REBUKED by more of the Military this time - Chairman Joint chiefs of Staff Mark Milley

Statement from the Chairman of Joint Chiefs of Staff Mark Milley

https://twitter.com/thejointstaff/status/1268239884013142017?s=20


#75

Three arrests of members of the “boogaloo” movement who are right-wing agitators with military training, and found with Molotov cocktails heading to incite more violence.

It is the opportunistic right-wing nuts who come in on the coattails of a legitimate protest for George Lloyd and rabble rouse, destroy property and try to pin it on the Black Lives Matter movement.

LAS VEGAS — Three Nevada men with ties to a loose movement of right-wing extremists advocating the overthrow of the U.S. government have been arrested on terrorism-related charges in what authorities say was a conspiracy to spark violence during recent protests in Las Vegas.

Federal prosecutors say the three white men with U.S. military experience are accused of conspiring to carry out a plan that began in April in conjunction with protests to reopen businesses closed because of the coronavirus and later sought to capitalize on protests over George Floyd, the Minneapolis man who died police custody.

They were arrested Saturday on the way to a protest in downtown Las Vegas after filling gas cans at a parking lot and making Molotov cocktails in glass bottles, according to a copy of the criminal complaint.

U.S. Attorney for the District of Nevada Nicholas A. Trutanich said authorities have been focused on violent instigators hijacking peaceful protests and demonstrations across the country to exploit “the real and legitimate outrage over Mr. Floyd’s death for their own radical agendas.”

Floyd, a 46-year-old black man, died after a white Minneapolis police officer kept his knee pressed into his neck for more than eight minutes. Across the country, protesters took to the streets for a fourth day to express their anger of his death.

The complaint filed in U.S. District Court in Las Vegas on Wednesday said the men self-identified as part of the “boogaloo” movement, which U.S. prosecutors said in the document is “a term used by extremists to signify coming civil war and/or fall of civilization.”

Stephen T. Parshall, 35, Andrew T. Lynam Jr., 23, and William L. Loomis, 40, were being held on $1 million bond each in the Clark County jail Wednesday, according to court records.

Each currently faces two federal charges — conspiracy to damage and destroy by fire and explosive, and possession of unregistered firearms — along with multiple terrorism-related state charges.


#76

The impetuous and imbecilic President’s actions throughout the Coronavirus pandemic handling, his constant need to steal the spotlight for his re-election purposes and now the tone-deaf response to this eruption of rage as the nation mourns has been nothing short of outrageous. The very core to of Democracy has been severely rattled, dismantled and cast aside for one man’s callous and shallow needs.

We can never normalize how badly his (lying) words and actions have been so thoughtlessly presented. As this Foreign Policy article states, we are indeed teetering.

Each time another a major criticism comes in the form of media, or Generals, or previous presidents, we are taken aback and hope now is the time that we can get him out of office.

Go time…now or never…he’s got to go.

Argument

A Moment of National Shame and Peril—and Hope

We may be witnessing the beginning of the end of American democracy, but there is still a way to stop the descent.

The slide of the United States into illiberalism may well have begun on June 1, 2020. Remember the date. It may well signal the beginning of the end of the American experiment.

The president of the United States stood in the Rose Garden of the White House on Monday, railed against weak governors and mayors who were not doing enough, in his mind, to control the unrest and the rioters in their cities, and threatened to deploy the U.S. military against American citizens. It was a stunning moment. But, in particular, it was notable for three important reasons.

First, Donald Trump expressed only the barest of condolences at the murder of George Floyd, but he also said nothing about the fundamental and underlying reasons for the unrest: systemic racism and inequality, a historic absence of respect, and a denial of justice. All of these factors are centuries old and deeply engrained in an American society that systematically delivers white privilege at the expense of people of color.

Yes, he mentioned George Floyd, but he did not touch on long-standing societal problems at all. He sees the crisis as a black problem—not as something to be addressed by creating the basis and impetus for a move toward social justice, but as an opportunity to use force to portray himself as a “law and order” president. The reasons were irrelevant to the opportunity. Remember the supposed invasion of the southern border and his deployment of federal troops ahead of the 2018 midterm elections? The president’s failure to understand the reality of the problem was on full display when, on Saturday, he attempted to explain that his supporters, the so-called Make America Great Again (MAGA) movement, “love African American people. They love black people. MAGA loves the black people.” Evidently his movement, MAGA, is a coherent thing, and it’s white, which leads to the next point about his speech.

Second, Trump was clear he views those engaged in the unrest and criminal acts in these riots as terrorists, an enemy. He said so, ostensibly as justification to deploy the U.S. military to apply federal force—his “personal” force—against the riots. Indeed, the secretary of defense used the military term “battlespace” to describe American cities.

While there may be some very accomplished criminals on both sides of the riots, the truth is that they are minuscule in numbers. The vast majority of the people protesting in the streets are justifiably furious at the murder of George Floyd, but they’re even angrier over pervasive injustice, mass incarceration, frequent false arrests, and an institutionalized devaluation of black lives and property. And yes, as this anger has spilled over, violence and criminality have ensued. But as much as the president would like them to be—indeed, needs them to be—terrorists, that is not what these people are. The president and members of his administration seem bent on ensuring that the so-called antifa—or anti-fascist—movement is fully on display as a principal reason for the violence. To deal with antifa, the president even tweeted that he intended to designate the group a terrorist organization—never mind that he has no authority to designate any domestic movement as such. Those of us who’ve looked closely at homegrown violent extremism do, in fact, agree that a domestic terrorism statute should exist. And were such a statute to come into being, the obvious targets for designation as domestic terrorists are, first and foremost, violent white supremacist groups and individuals who provide material assistance to these groups.The obvious targets for designation as domestic terrorists are, first and foremost, violent white supremacist groups and those who assist them. And even if antifa is found to fit the statute as well, let me be clear: White supremacists have murdered, lynched, tortured, terrorized, oppressed, and discriminated against black Americans from the beginning of the idea of America. They have killed black Americans by the thousands, often in the most horrific ways imaginable. Far more damage to the United States has come from these terrorists—fascists, Klansmen, and neo-Nazis, all feeling newly empowered today—than those who have opposed them.

Finally, the governors have sufficient law enforcement capacity—and, if necessary, the combat power of the National Guard—to handle their respective crises. If not, they can ask for federal assistance. There is no precedent in modern U.S. history for a president to wield federal troops in a state or municipality over the objections of the respective governor. Right now, the last thing the country needs—and, frankly, the U.S. military needs—is the appearance of U.S. soldiers carrying out the president’s intent by descending on American citizens. This could wreck the high regard Americans have for their military, and much more.

Third, in a bid to create some appearance that he can empathize with those demonstrating peacefully in the streets, the president proclaimed himself the “ally of peaceful protesters.” But, at that very moment, just a few hundred feet away across Lafayette Park, fully equipped riot police and troops violently, and without provocation, set upon the peaceful demonstrators there, manhandling and beating many of them, employing flash-bangs, riot-control agents, and pepper spray throughout. These demonstrators had done nothing to warrant such an attack. Media who were watching over the scene craned their cameras to try to understand what had happened to justify this violence, until it became clear for all to see. The riot police had waded into these nonviolent American citizens—who were protesting massive social injustice—with the sole purpose of clearing the area around St. John’s Episcopal Church, on the other side of the park, so the self-proclaimed “ally of peaceful protesters,” Donald Trump, could pose there for a photo-op.

There had evidently been a debate within the president’s inner circle about the efficacy of attempting a national statement to create a sense of unity in this moment of crisis. Clearly, the argument in favor of such a statement did not carry the day. The president has failed to show sympathy, empathy, compassion, or understanding—some of the traits the nation now needs from its highest office. Perhaps sensing this moment as an opportunity for an easy victory after his appalling leadership failure in dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, the president came down hard: hard on the governors and mayors he’d labeled as weak, the same ones he’d left to fend for themselves during the pandemic, and hard on the Americans in the streets against whom he is preparing to dispatch “thousands upon thousands of heavily armed soldiers, military personnel, and law enforcement.” At the end of his speech, offhandedly saying something about going to pay homage to a national shrine, the president departed back into the White House.Donald Trump isn’t religious, has no need of religion, and doesn’t care about the devout, except insofar as they serve his political needs.

St. John’s Episcopal Church is one of the most historic churches in the United States, in which every president since James Madison has worshipped. It had been damaged the night before, when a fire had been contained in the basement with little damage. But on the afternoon of June 1, it was surrounded by members of the U.S. Secret Service, other law enforcement personnel, and soldiers. Tear gas was hanging in the air, with vomit still on the street from demonstrators overcome by gas and pepper spray. The debris of peaceful protesters attacked in the clearing operation littered the street. As it became clear where the president was headed, and as the reality of what was unfolding set in, a horrified nation looked on.

The president stood in front of St. John’s, holding a Bible aloft, and expropriated the image of the church, the Holy Bible, and the Christian faith as the backdrop and basis for his words and deeds in dealing with this crisis. It wasn’t enough that peaceful protesters had just been deprived of their first-amendment rights—this photo-op sought to legitimize that abuse with a layer of religion. To make matters worse, he was joined in the church photo-op by the other members of his staff and cabinet, including the press secretary, the chief of staff, and the national security advisor. Much worse still, he was joined in the picture by Secretary of Defense Mark Esper and Attorney General William Barr.


(David Bythewood) #77

I know twitter link previews are not working right now, but providing ONLY screenshots without links is frustrating, as then you have to go track those posts down.


#78

Yes please always provide a link!


(David Bythewood) #79

The Washington post calls Trump’s photo-op what it is: propaganda.

Video in link from CAP: America Under Trump:

https://twitter.com/CAPAction/status/1268261873981456385

Barr has ordered new fencing and concrete barriers around the White House. Trump is building the wall dozens of political cartoons have mocked him as building. Many of these tweets have video and pictures.
https://twitter.com/betsy_klein/status/1268491075343319041?s=20
https://twitter.com/johnpavlovitz/status/1268535451222192129?s=20
https://twitter.com/JRubinBlogger/status/1268587771477872643?s=20
https://twitter.com/Vasu/status/1268585450660380673?s=20

We can make this the tipping point

Trump has built his wall — around the White House. Instead of going down into the bunker, the cringing president has made the White House into a bunker, shielded behind fencing to keep at bay his countrymen, who have decisively turned against him.


https://www.newsweek.com/white-house-fence-protests-washington-1508703

Trump Built Tthe Wall, Around Himself

Trump is trying to project strength, but instead betraying weakness.

WATCH: The White House Adds Concrete Barrier Wall Amid George Floyd Protests


https://twitter.com/kjhealy/status/1268513257830125568?s=20


My thread on this:
https://twitter.com/windthin/status/1268608167136673794?s=20


#80

Ok…added a couple just now. @Windthin and @Pet_Proletariat

I had just figured on a tweet, you can read the source and go find it.

Got it.